Safety
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Safety of Sailing and Surfing in Sheboygan Integrated Nowcast / Forecast Operation system

Danger in the Great Lakes

     Extreme waves mainly occur during major storms at sea by means of constructive interference of wave trains or by nonlinear wave interaction, but extreme waves may also be associated with tsunami or meteotsunami events. If they arrive at the coast, most extreme waves have the potential to cause extensive remodeling and repositioning of the shoreline environment and landforms as well as causing significant damage to human infrastructure and threat to life.

Amplitude Time Series of "New Year Wave": The maximal wave height of 25.6m is much more than twice the significant wave height of about 10.8m

Extreme Waves

     Extreme waves mainly occur during major storms at sea by means of constructive interference of wave trains or by nonlinear wave interaction, but extreme waves may also be associated with tsunami or meteotsunami events. If they arrive at the coast, most extreme waves have the potential to cause extensive remodeling and repositioning of the shoreline environment and landforms as well as causing significant damage to human infrastructure and threat to life.

Amplitude Time Series of "New Year Wave": The maximal wave height of 25.6m is much more than twice the significant wave height of about 10.8m

Rip Currents

     Rip currents are approximately shore normal seaward directed flows. They typically reach speeds up to 1 m/s, and have been reported as high as 2 m/s in mega-rips such as at Palm Beach, Australia [Short, 1985]. Rip currents are the most visible feature of nearshore circulation systems, often identified by sediments being carried offshore. Rip currents generally form when waves approach normal to the shoreline or at a slight angle. However, if the angle is too great, the tendency for rip currents to form diminishes. Rip currents return the water transported shoreward by waves and, under certain conditions of nearshore slope and wave activity, rip currents are the primary agent for the seaward transport of water and sediments. Rip currents are usually narrow (10-20 m in the alongshore direction) and generally span the entire water column, however, offshore of the surf zone they tend to be confined near the surface (Shepard et al.,1941). Interest in studying rip currents is motivated by their importance to nearshore processes such as offshore sediment transport, shoreline evolution, and pollutant transport.Public interest in rip currents is due to beach safety issues and beach erosion (Short, 1985).

Image Courtesy: Lifesaving Society, Municipality of Northern Bruce Peninsula, The Coastal Centre

Hypothermia

Image Courtesy: National Weather Service Grand Rapids

Read More

     Cold Water Immersion Chart

     Communications Instructions Distress and Rescue Procedures

     Distress Communication Form

     EPIRB Basics

     Lifesling Instruction Manual

     Lifesling Preparation Guide

     Man Overboard Tips

     Lake Michigan SuRF Newsletter

     North Sails: Heavy Weather Sailing Basis


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